"The Lupins Out The Back" Oil on Canvas by Richard Robinson

Starting to get the hang of these water soluble oils. Laying down very watery washes to begin with makes for easier painting on top. Most previous paintings have been attempted over an oily base which makes it difficult to paint over and the paint doesn't stick so well to an oily surface. Spraying water onto those initial washes and letting it dribble or patting some water off with a paper towel produces interesting textural effects.

Although the weather turned out very overcast this subject seems to suit the flat light and soft shadows. The sandflies nearly drove us mad but we persevered. Happy to be making progress. Felt a bit like I was channeling Richard Schmid or Tibor Nagy with this one.

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Comment by Joyce Botha on January 14, 2014 at 0:48

Dear Richard, I also bought a sample set of the mixable water oil paint.  But I find it hard to work with as it is very clotted ? lumpy ? and have to mix and flatten it with the palette knife.  I added more water for my back ground.  I also found the drying time too long.    So, I will stick to my acrylic paint thank you.  Richard I love watching your videos and the few that I could download was a very big gift to me.  I have deleted most other paint instructors I had,  you are my main teacher.

Comment by Britt Greenland on December 31, 2013 at 5:08
I just bought a set of water mixable oils to use for indoor painting demos at the gallery. I read that they can mix with oil mediums for faster drying. I usually use Liquin, but for the sake of fewer fumes will use Galkid (by Gamblin) instead. I also read that they can be mixed with either acrylics or traditional oil paint, although I would think the latter would negate the ability for water cleanup!
Comment by Richard Robinson on December 13, 2013 at 8:31

Thanks Ed, they actually dry slower. Not sure if you can mix them with standard oils, haven't tried that, would have to read the literature. They feel about 90% of what standard oils are like to paint with. I use them to stay away from harmful solvents and mediums.

Comment by Ed Pavuk on December 13, 2013 at 7:22

Great piece, Richard!   I accidentally picked up a tube of Water Soluble Oil paint on my last trip to the art store.  I didn't even know they made them!   I'm assuming they dry much quicker than oils. Are there any other advantages to using them?  Can you/do you mix them with oils or do you typically use them for a base wash?      

Comment by Dorian Aronson on December 9, 2013 at 14:54

Hi Faisal

I welcome you to Complete Artist!  You have come to the right place!  Have visited your web page and you certainly are a real Artist!  You will enjoy learning from Richard Robinson and have a cool time with all of us young and old!  Smiles to you.............PS I am an old beginner but I love Water Soluble Oil also.........

Comment by Faisal Tariq on December 9, 2013 at 9:22

I just became a member and very new to this forum.

This painting is truly lovely Richard.  I have been using Water Soluble Oil for over a year.  I would say that some of the brands out there are really not that good as they become gummy with water.  I would recommend Holbein Duo.  I have recently started using only water and Holbein Duo and that is it.  The water essentially acts like the turp.  I would like to get some feedback from people from my on-line blog/gallery.  www.faisaltariq.com. Any feedback will be helpful.  I want to grow up to be an artist… :)

Comment by Adriana Guidi on December 8, 2013 at 19:05

Oh I love this Richard! I've been using water mixable oils for a while now,but just recently I've figured out to make them flow better with water mixable linseed oil.

Comment by Jessica Futerman on December 8, 2013 at 8:52

This is gorgeous!  I always really liked the effect of very watery first washes on the canvas with water soluble oils!  I began doing it when I started using WSO's after painting with water colours, because I didn't know anything about using mediums.  I think it makes for beautiful light with the white of the canvas filtering through.  I love the contrast & textures you have made with the thin washes & the heavier applications of paint - beautiful!  I have always painted over those thin washes, but maybe I'll start experimenting with leaving some of them!  

Comment by Dorian Aronson on December 8, 2013 at 8:13

Thank you for this...............Starting to get the hang of these water soluble oils. Laying down very watery washes to begin with makes for easier painting on top. Most previous paintings have been attempted over an oily base which makes it difficult to paint over and the paint doesn't stick so well to an oily surface. Spraying water onto those initial washes and letting it dribble or patting some water off with a paper towel produces interesting textural effects.    

Comment by Jen C r u d e n on December 7, 2013 at 20:12

Richard, thought you had the 'hang' of them before. I could not get used to them, so may try what you are suggesting above. This painting looks really interesting with the different textures, methods you have used.   Colours on the building and the aging fantastic.  Can understand the sandflies/mozzies with all those trees/bushes around, especially down where you are.  Recommend - 'Bushmans ultra insect repellant'... best mossie preventative there is.  (Tried them all - in Oz and down sth - this one works.) Enjoy trip south.

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