This is from Robert Genn: "...There's a wide range of reasons for blockage. One of the most frequent is the buildup of bad habits in basic techniques learned in lesser workshops or from hit-and-miss self-teaching. Another source of blockage is what we call "Educosis," that is, too much theoretical knowledge with very little actual easel-time. These folks often hate what they do and abandon early. Still others have issues of self-esteem, self-loathing, imposter syndrome and guilt..." THAT'S IT!! "Educosis"!! Finally found a name for my (past) malady! lol!
   

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Comment by Carolyn Brunsdon on September 1, 2013 at 12:55

About time, too Betsy!

Comment by Betsy Jenkins on September 1, 2013 at 12:31

Right there with you, Carolyn! Old ladies (like us) rule!

Comment by Carolyn Brunsdon on September 1, 2013 at 12:24

Oh boy...it is a very good thing. Been straddling the fence too long, allowing the tail to wag the dog. (And in my case, the tail is obligations perceived or otherwise, to other people to the exclusion of taking care of myself. Getting to be an old lady time for "my" time...

Comment by Betsy Jenkins on September 1, 2013 at 12:15

Carolyn, This workshop will give you LOTS of easel time to practice that theoretical knowledge. And there are some professional artists here who have mastered BOTH theoretical and practical aspects, and who go overboard to help us. So glad you have decided to  stick around for the ride. It's a doozy!

Comment by Carolyn Brunsdon on August 26, 2013 at 10:14

Ahhh, I see that you understand also! :))

Comment by Montalvo on August 25, 2013 at 18:43

LOl...Thank You for sharing.

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